Bad at Sports
Bad At Sports is a weekly podcast about contemporary art. Founded in 2005, badatsports.com focuses on presenting the practices of artists, curators, critics, dealers, various other arts professionals through an online audio format.

This week: Duncan, Richard and Amanda talk Nonsense with Jeff Stark!

What is Nonsense NYC?
Nonsense NYC is a discriminating resource for independent art, weird events, strange happenings, unique parties, and senseless culture in New York City.

What does that mean?
We send out an email every Friday about unique events occurring the following week.

What kind of stuff?
Street events, loft parties, puppet shows, bike rallys, costume balls, interactive art shows, movies in unusual places, parades, outlaw dancing, guerilla theater, burlesque and variety shows, loser open mikes, cirkuses, and absurdist pranks. Nonsense covers the stuff that has no name, or a name that you feel really awkward and self-conscious saying out loud, like "underground."

Sounds great, how do I sign up?
Click here.

Um, I'd rather not give you my email address. Can I just read it online?
No. The only place you can read Nonsense NYC is your inbox. We like the intimacy of email, thank you, and this Web stuff is too much work. We promise not to sell your email address or give it away. We're not going to spam you with useless information either.

OK, I've signed up, and I want to know more about Nonsense. Will you print my event?
We'd love to hear about all of your events. The important thing to remember is that Nonsense NYC happens because of you. That means we rely on you to let us know what events you're organizing and what events you're attending. Please keep us up to date and don't assume that we'll find out about it from someone else. Our job is to gather, edit, organize, and filter; your job is to make interesting things happen and let us know about them. Remember to include all the important information, like the address and stuff, and a brief description. When you put it all together, send it to jstark@nonsensenyc.com. Please send a text-only email; flash graphics, links to online fliers, and facebook announcements make our life more difficult. You can find a guide to better email communication here.

Also, Nonsense does not list events that cost more than $25 at the door, without door code, RSVPs, or special arrangement. We make some exceptions for obvious extra expenses, like boat rentals. To those of you promoting events: We're sorry. We know it's hard. We know it's risky. We know it's expensive. But nonsense has always skewed toward cheaper events; our readers expect it.

But one time I sent you something about my band/my movie/my party/my opening and you didn't print it. What gives? How do you decide what events will be on Nonsense NYC?
To start with, almost all the stuff we list is independent. Also, we like rock bands and experimental musicians and arty films and galleries and museums and big street festivals, but we can find information about all of those things in other places. We generally will not list them.

We use something called the rule of three. That means that we will generally list your event if there are three different things going on: DJs, bands, dancers, costumes, fire performance, theater, film, art, projections, fashion, an unusual space, or several other intangibles. Your event doesn't have to include all of these in order to be listed, and it certainly doesn't need all this at once. If you're in doubt, send it to us anyway -- we're decent editors.

The list is huge sometimes. Where do you find all this stuff? Do you write all of it yourself?
We don't really write so much as edit announcements from other people. The bulk of each weekly list is culled from other lists and Web calendars. We monitor a couple dozen of them. You can find a partial listing on the Links page.

So, do you go to all of the events that you list on Nonsense?
Not even. We can't afford it. We go out a couple of times a week, and we generally write a small editorial note if we have an opinion to share. You can find those comments in each post. They're all marked like this: NOTE.

How can I tell the good events from the bad ones? Will I have fun at all the events?
No, you won't always have fun. And please don't assume that merely listing this stuff is some sort of implicit endorsement. A lot of these events are strictly amateur hour. We love amateur hour. But the problem with some amateurs is that they're just amateurs. It's hard to distinguish the good stuff from the bad. Some of it, no doubt, will make you wish you'd sat on the couch eating microwave nachos. If you want a safe bet, go to the movies.

That said, if you start going to a lot of the events listed here you'll start to recognize some of the names of performers, promoters, venues, and so forth.

Let us know if you have a great time at an event. Hell, let us know if you feel like you got scammed out of $5. Send us a sentence or two about the events you've attended -- especially if you went to something that is ongoing -- and we'll run them in the future. You don't have to be a professional writer or do anything fancy. Just tell us what you would tell your friends over a late breakfast. Your fellow subscribers will appreciate it.

Why does the new Nonsense come out so late? Can't you get it out earlier?
No, we can't. It takes a long time to put this thing together. We have real jobs, and real lives. Both prohibit us from compiling the list earlier in the week. We try to run events for the following Thursday so you can have a heads up, but a lot of the people who do the kind of events that we list don't always have their shit together.

We print stuff that's happening on the day we post because sometime the show will happen a few more times throughout the weekend. Sometimes there will be a contact listed and you can use it to reach people and make sure that you don't miss their events in the future. If you check your email before you go out you'll still have time to make a snap decision.

What's with the "we?"
We don't know. We got used to writing like this several years ago and we kind of like it. It has a lot of antecedents, including the unsigned Talk of the Town section in the old New Yorker. We'd like to think that it alludes to that sort of liveliness and sparkling wit. You may disagree. We will cherish our delusions.

Conceptually, we thought that Nonsense NYC would be sort of a group effort, with its subscribers kicking down a lot of the weekly copy. It didn't really turn out that way, but we still like to hold on to the thought that Nonsense is put together by its community. In a way, it is: It would be a mighty boring list if there were no events to compile, and the people who make these events happen are the kind of people who receive it.

So who exactly is "we," and why are you doing this?
Nonsense NYC is compiled by Jeff Stark. Alita Edgar graciously puts together the Wishlist section. Jennifer Liepin edits the Help section. Juliana Driever is responsible for the Learning section. J. Sinopli is the person behind Spectre Priority. Neille Ilel did all the Web stuff.

Why are you doing this?
We believe that there is more to life in New York than getting drunk at slick new bars. We were frustrated when we moved here and couldn't find a reliable source of alternatives, even though we knew that there were creative people making cool shit happen. Almost more annoying was the fact that certain groups we knew about weren't always aware of one another.

Our solution was to start a weekly list. We did this in September 2000. Our goals are to help make New York a more interesting place to live, to encourage others to do the same, and to have more fun than just about anyone else. We're particularly drawn to participatory culture, amateurism, and urban folk art. To us, that means that things are more rewarding when you invest yourself in them, and that you are responsible for entertaining yourself and your friends.

We admire the handmade, the recycled. And we're generally suspicious of commercial entertainment. That doesn't mean we reflexively hate television or going to the movies. It's just that we genuinely believe that everyone has something to contribute, and that life is much richer when people stop treating each other like walking wallets.

Wow, this all sounds so lofty. Are these your ideas?
Not even. We're stealing ideas from a half dozen places and using the bits that suit us. In particular, we are indebted to Fluxus games, the Cacophony Society, the Suicide Club, the Situationists, American punk rock in the 1980s, the Do-It-Yourself ethic of the early 1990s, the Madagascar Institute, Dark Passage, and the yearly Burning Man festival in Nevada.

We do think that we are witnessing a special synthesis of these ideas in New York right now -- this very minute -- and that in a few years we will recognize it as a golden age.

OK. So how do you make money off of this?
That's not really the point. However Nonsense now accepts donations. The newsletter remains free, but there are real costs that we absorb in its creation. We would love for you to donate money to help offset webhosting, software, and computer expenses. The labor remains free.

We aren't asking for much; a yearly subscription would be a tremendous help. Please consider $5 for the year if you use the list to figure out what to do on a Saturday night, or if you just like to keep track of what's going on in New York.

Go ahead and donate $20 if you promote events that we list on Nonsense. You know it's worth it. And we would be grateful for more money if you really like what we do.

To be clear, these are donations: You are not paying for a service, but rather confirming that what we do is valuable and agreeing that independent artists should support other independent artists. If you've ever paid for a ticket to see your friend's band you know exactly what we mean.

But I want to complain about something. Who can I yell at?
You're getting this ostensibly for free; you're not allowed to complain. If you have to yell at someone, try a taxi driver: They're used to it.

I'm not getting the list. What's up?
We don't know. First, you should check your spam folder. Several of the major email providers sometimes think Nonsense is spam; first Yahoo and Hotmail, and eventually AOL and even Gmail blocked some newsletters. We use Dada Mail and Tiger Tech and are always trying to fix this problem.

If you don't find Nonsense in your spam folder there are a couple of things that you can do. You can approve messages from us or put us in your address book or on your whitelist. You can sign up with another email account. And if that doesn't work you can use your password to access our archives online.

This should be pretty obvious, but please do not flag our messages as spam for any reason. If you want to unsubscribe, please take a minute and follow the link at the bottom of every list or send us an email. Finally, it helps our case if you send an email to your provider to complain that Nonsense is being marked as spam or held.

I forgot what I was going to say, but I'll probably remember my question later.
email us anytime.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_465-Nonsense.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 5:25 AM

This week: Painter, filmmaker and producer Martin Jon Garcia get lightly abused by Dana and Richard and we talk about his show Our Cultural Center which can be viewed at www.ourculturalcenter.com (just saw MJG has had some health challenges of late and a heart felt BAS get well soon goes out to him!). Next Amanda Browder records the last interview with artist, Dali muse and Warhol Superstart Ultra Violet who left the mortal coil June 14th of 2014.

Nearly to the end of our 9th season, into the 10th. What interesting things await us for the 10th year of BAS?

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_464-Garcia_and_Ultra_Violet.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 6:44 AM

This week: From Volta 2014 we talk to painter and muralist Maya Hayuk.

Duncan's announcements:

http://www.walkerart.org/calendar/2014/byor-bring-your-own-radio-and-tailgate

http://poorfarmexperiment.org/

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_463-Maya_Hayuk.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 6:29 AM

This week: We might as well hang it up after this one, I mean where do we go from here?

Rebecca Goyette:

Rebecca Goyette studied undergraduate at RISD and received her MFA from SVA in New York. She has shown widely at venues in NYC and elsewhere, including solos at Airplane Gallery, NYC, (Lobsta Porn Theater), Jersey City Museum, Jersey City, NJ, (4-Eva.), the NY Studio Gallery, NYC, (Delicious.) and Galerie X, Istanbul, Turkey (Union/Bulusma.). She has completed residencies at the DNA Summer Residency, Provincetown, MA, the Offshore Project sponsored by Omada Filopappou, in Karamyli, Greece, and Byrdcliffe in Woodstock, NY. Goyette lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Lou Reads:

Lou Reads. What is it? Well, basically its a reason for me to practice reading. Why? Because I have a dream of doing voice overs for a living. I realize that in the future, like everything else, a computer will do that job. But for now I’ll continue to entertain myself and hopefully you by reading the madness of the world wide web.

You’re probably saying, “Why read from the internet, Lou? Why not read something that makes sense? You should read a book or like a play.”

Seriously, you should shut up. I find the internet to be an amazing and almost bottomless pit of inspiration. In particular I find the Something Awful forums to be super awesome. Why? Because it features a huge user base of somewhat like minded jerks who are extremely active. The community just keeps churning out the goodness on a semi-daily basis. Goodness in the form of overly personal stories of woe or achievement, hilarious collections of images and so much more.

So, I plan to read mainly from the Something Awful forums for the most part. If anyone knows of a more active and equally verbose site I would love to check it out. My problem has been that most other forums I’ve been to have way to high a noise to signal ratio. For every earnest and interesting post there are 10 shit replies, flames and trolls.

I will read other things. Don’t you worry! And if you want to suggest something then drop me a line.

Thanks for listening!

Your friend for as long as you listen to my podcast,

King Lou Fernandez

It's a whole new world.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_462-NSFW.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 7:01 AM

This week: Patricia realized who she wanted to be when she grows up when she sat down with the majestic Rhodessa Jones. They talk about the creation of The Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women, and we learn that the California Arts Council once funded aerobics classes for female inmates. The Medea Project seeks to use the transformative potential of art to stem the recidivism rate for women prisoners. It is dedicated to the power that storytelling—of speaking in the first person—possesses to replace shame with resilience and to bring compassion into extreme circumstances. No allusions to OITNB are made, but Vee wouldn’t stand a chance against Rhodessa.

 

Performer, teacher, director, Rhodessa Jones is Co-Artistic Director of San Francisco’s performance company Cultural Odyssey. Jones directsThe Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women, an award-winning performance workshop committed to incarcerated women’s personal and social transformation, now in it’s 25th year. As recipient of the U.S. Artist Fellowship, Jones expanded her work in jails and educational institutions internationally. She conducts Medea Projects in South African prisons, working with incarcerated women and training local artists and correctional personnel to embed the Medea process inside these institutions. In 2012, she was named Arts Envoy by the U.S. Embassy in South Africa. Recent U.S. residencies include Brown University and Scripps College Humanities Institute. She also was the Spring 2014 Interdisciplinary Artist in Residence at the University of Wisconsin. Mayor Ed Lee and the San Francisco Art Commission presented the 2013 Mayor's Art Award to Jones, for her "lifetime of artistic achievement and enduring commitment to the role of the arts in civic life. In addition, she is the recipient of an Honorary Doctorate from the California College of the Arts, SF Bay Guardian’s Lifetime Achievement Award, SF Foundation’s Community Leadership Award, Non-Profit Arts Excellence Award by the SF Business Arts Council, and an Otto Rene Castillo Award for Political Theater.

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_461-Rhodessa_Jones.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 6:14 AM

This week: Dana B makes a run for the border. Dana B from What's the T? interviews jet-setting artists Leonor Antunes at ZONA MACO and Carson Fisk Vittori at Material Art Fair. In her final dispatch from Mexico City, Dana B. interviews Joel Dean and Jason Benson of Oakland's important projects on IP's booth at Material Art Fair, their duo show at Lodos Contemporáneo, fashion earring trends, blue masa tortillas and how we suggested she become a drug mule in order to pay her expenses on the trip versus sending in her receipts to the home office.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_460-Dana_causan_problemas_en_Mxico.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 11:58 AM

This week: Adam Parker Smith, he's more hilariouser than you, shut up. Lots of inappropriate stuff discussed. Dirty jokes too.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_459-_Adam_Parker_Smith.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 8:56 PM

This week: To explain the show this week, I will use an internal BAS e-mail:

 

 

From: Richard Holland [mailto:richard@beyondpropertiesrealty.com]
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 12:53 AM
To: 'Duncan MacKenzie'
Subject: This weeks "show"

-------

Dear Duncan,

 

In 458 weeks we have generated some good interviews, some bad interviews, some memorable, some forgettable, but this week is something new.

 

The audio you sent me, which I *think* was supposed to be an interview about the truly interesting End/Spring Break project with some combination of  the artists Domingo Castillo, Patti Hernandez and/or Kathryn Marks along with BAS reporters Dana B. Brian A, and Patricia M, joining you for the fun, is, if presented as an interview, not an interview. What I have is the equivilant of sticking a tape recorder behind the bar on "free demerol night" and letting it roll.. It is more sound art than interview and is admittedly in moments damn funny. Have you seen "Party Monster"?

 

This is all a lead up to saying, "I'm not fucking editing this mess, I'm running it raw", which is a rare moment of prophetic skill, I predicted would be my reaction when we talked about it while recording the intro.

 

I can't make heads or tails of it all despite serious effort, and there are some funny and interesting moments, though I have cursed your name at great length and had to run out for extra voodoo doll pins, I will admit the audio is in line with the spirit of the project.

 

I will direct all negligent infliction of emotional distress inquiries to you at home once they flood the mailbox.

 

You take the good, you take the bad, you take them both and there you have; this hour of audio.

 

RH

 

PS: If problems result I suggest we go with "Strategem #27 'Blame Dana B'" I've drawn up the papers and hired the cleaning crew.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_458-Spring_Broken.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 5:41 AM

This week: Dana B's (What's the T?) Mexcellent Adventure continues. She talks with Gallerists Cristobal Riestra (Galeria OMR) and Machael Jon (Michael Jon Gallery).

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_457-Dana_B_in_Mexico.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 4:08 AM

This week: BAS west coast checks in from the YBCA for a chat with Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_456-Jacqueline_Kiyomi_Gordon.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 3:54 AM