Bad at Sports
Bad At Sports is a weekly podcast about contemporary art. Founded in 2005, badatsports.com focuses on presenting the practices of artists, curators, critics, dealers, various other arts professionals through an online audio format.
Bad at Sports Episode 278: Steven Leiber

This week: Patrica, Brian, and Duncan chat with one-of-a-kind private art dealer and fountain of knowledge Steven Leiber. Steven Leiber is most commonly known for operating Steven Leiber's Basement which specializes in the sale of contemporary art and contemporary art documentation: artist's books, artist's ephemera, multiples, works on paper and reference materials. The conversation delves in to the history of Steven's artist ephemera collections and the unique catalogs his endeavors produce. This episode is part of the series recorded this fall at Baer Ridgeway Exhibitions.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_278-Steven_Leiber.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 2:17am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 277: Roger White

This week: Amanda and Tom go to the Rachel Uffner Gallery to talk with Roger White about his self titled show at the gallery which ran October 29th-December 13th. Roger talks about the show and painting as well as being an artist/journalist as the Vermont based artist is also a frequent contributor to the Brooklyn Rail as well as one of the founders of Paper Monument.

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_277-Roger_White.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:14pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 276: Hubert Neumann

This week: Tom, Amanda, and Duncan talk to super collector Hubert Neumann. He's candid, he doesn't mince words and he knows a ton of stuff, don't miss it.

Also, Richard thinks that the Smithsonian and National Portrait Gallery are striving to redefine "spineless cowards" in their role in the museum word. Great job guys, I look forward to seeing what a Fox News curated museum looks like!

Please be sure to take a moment and e-mail the following people your thoughts on their caving in to political censorship.

Bethany Bentley
Public Affairs Specialist
bentleyb@si.edu

Julia Zirinsky
Public Affairs Assistant
zirinskyj@si.edu
rule

Sherri Weil
Director of Development
and External Affairs
weils@si.edu

Charlotte Gaither
Deputy Director of Development
gaitherc@si.edu

Kristy Snaman
External Affairs Specialist
snamank@si.edu

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_276-Hubert_Neumann.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:28pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 275: Lindsey White

This week: Brian, Patricia and Duncan get into the mind of Lindsey White. They discuss the challenges of being a photographer in an image saturated-culture, light, magic, and the intimate details of White's studio practice. Lindsey White is a San Francisco based photographer and video artist born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. This is the third interview in our series recorded at Baer Ridgeway Exhibitions as a part of Chris Duncan's Eye Against Eye exhibition.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_275-Lindsey_White.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:59pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 274: Julio Cesar Morales

This week: Brian, Patricia, and Duncan engage in a round table with Julio César Morales about collaboration, curation, pedagogy, and his recent exhibitions. Julio César Morales is an artist, educator and curator currently working both individually and collaboratively. Morales utilizes a range of media including photography, video, and printed and digital media to make conceptual projects that address the productive friction that occurs in trans-cultural territories such as urban Tijuana and San Francisco, and in inherently impure media such as popular music and graphic design. This is the second in our series of interviews conducted at Baer Ridgeway as part of Chris Duncan’s exhibition Eye Against Eye.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_274-Julio_Cesar_Morales.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:46am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 273: Luc Tuymans

This week: Duncan and Richard talk to art superstar Luc Tuymans!

 

The following is shamelessly lifted from the MCA site:

 

Luc Tuymans (Belgian, b. 1958) is considered one of the most significant European painters of his generation and he has been an enduring influence on younger and emerging artists. Born and raised in Antwerp, where he lives and works, Tuymans is an inheritor to the vast tradition of Northern European painting. At the same time, as a child of the 1950s, his relationship to the medium is understandably influenced by photography, television, and cinema.

Interested in the lingering effects of World War II on the lives of Europeans, Tuymans explores issues of history and memory, as well as the relationship between photography and painting, using a muted palette to create canvases that are simultaneously withholding and disarmingly stark. Drawing on imagery from photography, television, and film, his distinctive compositions make ingenious use of cropping, close-ups, framing, and Luc Tuymans sequencing, offering fresh perspectives on the medium of painting, as well as larger cultural issues.

The artist's more recent work approaches the post-colonial situation in the Congo and the dramatic turn of world events after 9/11. These series have led Tuymans to a sustained investigation of the realms of the pathological and the conspiratorial.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_273-Luc_Tuymans.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:06am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 272: Martina AltSchaefer

This week: Mark Staff Brandl talks to Martina AltSchaefer.This is the first of two interviews with German artists conducted by Mark Staf Brandl on the island of Elba, Italy. Martina AltSchaefer is an artist living in Ruessellsheim, Germany. She studied with the famed Konrad Kapheck and her creative work centers on very large, labor-intensive drawing in colored pencil on translucent paper. AltSchaefer has exhibited in many prestigious galleries and museums. She also does printmaking and is an expert on mezzotint, about which she has curated shows and written essays. She was in an invitational retreat in July as a working guest of a foundation on the island of Elba along with Viennese jazz pianist and composer Martin Reiter, New York playwright Sony Sobieski, Berlin artist Alexander Johannes Kraut (the interviewee in part two) and Mark Staff Brandl, the Bad at Sports Continental and now also islandal European Bureau. And for all the Napoleon fans, especially those commenting on facebook, they were not in exile and even Mark was allowed back on the mainland without having to invade it.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_272-Martina_AltSchaefer.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:03pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 271: Camille Utterback

This week: Duncan talks to "super G" certified genius artist Camille Utterback.

Camille Utterback is an internationally acclaimed artist whose interactive installations and reactive sculptures engage participants in a dynamic process of kinesthetic discovery and play. Utterback’s work explores the aesthetic and experiential possibilities of linking computational systems to human movement and gesture in layered and often humorous ways. Her work focuses attention on the continued relevance and richness of the body in our increasingly mediated world.

Her work has been exhibited at galleries, festivals, and museums internationally, including The New Museum of Contemporary Art, The American Museum of the Moving Image, New York; The NTT InterCommunication Center, Tokyo; The Seoul Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Netherlands Institute for Media Art; The Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art; The Center for Contemporary Art, Kiev, Ukraine; and the Ars Electronica Center, Austria. Utterback’s work is in private and public collections including Hewlett Packard, Itaú Cultural Institute in São Paolo, Brazil, and La Caixa Foundation in Barcelona, Spain.

Awards and honors include a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2009), a Transmediale International Media Art Festival Award (2005), a Rockefeller Foundation New Media Fellowship (2002) and a commission from the Whitney Museum for the CODeDOC project on their ArtPort website (2002). Utterback holds a US patent for a video tracking system she developed while working as a research fellow at New York University (2004). Her work has been featured in Art in America (October, 2004), Wired Magazine (February 2004), The New York Times (2009, 2003, 2002, 2001), ARTnews (2001) and many other publications. It is also included in Thames & Hudson’s ‘World of Art – Digital Art’ book (2003) by Christiane Paul.

Recent public commissions include works for The Sacramento Airport, The City of San Jose, California, The City of Fontana, California, and the City of St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Other commissions include projects for The American Museum of Natural History in New York, The Pittsburgh Children’s Museum, The Manhattan Children’s Museum, Herman Miller, Shiseido Cosmetics, and other private corporations.

Utterback holds a BA in Art from Williams College, and a Masters degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. She lives and works in San Francisco.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_271-Camille_Utterback.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:43am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 270: Tammy Rae Carland

This week: The kick off of a series of programs recorded at Baer Ridgway Exhibitions in San Francisco during BAS's mini residency as a guest of Chris Duncan during his "Eye Against I" exhibition. Brian and Duncan talk with Chris about the series, and then the main event Tammy Rae Carland! In addition to being a fascinating guest, Tammy is the only guest we've had who has a song written about them to utilize as their intro/outro clip (by the awesome band Bikini Kill no less).

Bio lifted from Tammy's site:

Tammy Rae Carland was born in Portland Maine in 1965. She received her MFA from UC Irvine, her BA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia Washington and attended the Whitney Independent Study Program. She is an Associate Professor at the California College of the Arts where she also Chairs the Photography Program. She is represented by Silverman Gallery in San Francisco and primarily works with photography, experimental video and small run publications. Her work has been screened and exhibited in galleries and museums internationally including New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Berlin and Sydney. Her photographs have been published in numerous books including The Passionate Camera; Queer Bodies of Desire and Lesbian Art in America. Her fanzine writing has been republished in A Girl’s Guide to Taking Over the World. She has also published photographs and received reviews of her work in numerous national media including: The New York Times, Big, The Los Angeles Times, Spin, Details, Out and The Village Voice. In the 1990’s Carland independently produced a series of influential fanzines, including I (heart) Amy Carter. She has collaborated on the record art of some seminal underground music releases for the bands Bikini Kill, The Fakes and The Butchies. From 1997-2005 she co-ran Mr. Lady Records and Videos, an independent record label and video art distribution company that was dedicated to the production and distribution of queer and feminist culture. Tammy Rae Carland lives in Oakland California.

 

PS: A hearty "Fuck You" to Libsyn and their crappy software. This is the third time I've written this. Turn off or down the "time out" function on your site, jerks.

 

 

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_270-Tammy_Rae_Carland.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:29pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 269: Alexis Rockman

This week: Tom and Duncan talk to super-talented painter Alexis Rockman. There is a lovely series up on the Leo Koenig web site: http://www.leokoenig.com/artist/view/460

The following stolen from the Greenpeace site:

Alexis' paintings visualise the hopes and popularly held fears about scientific progress and the wide-ranging effects of human intervention on animal species, ecosystems, and the natural world.

We are brought face to face with a future that is at once surreal and unsettlingly familiar. Mutant animals, geometric landscapes, alternative environments either sterilized by science or unredeemably altered due to pollution. All this makes for some uncomfortable viewing.

"My position is one of ambivalence as the horse is already out of the barn so to speak; it is not biotechnology that is the problem but corporate America or globalism or colonialism. The implications of using this technology are far more devastating because of the unknowable effects. This is something that is very disturbing and visually compelling to me," explains Alexis.

Despite the questions that Alexis' work throws up about humanity's role in shaping a dystopian future, there's no obvious judgement in it.

Every element in the art is painstakingly researched. All the biological images have been developed through extensive collaboration with specialists in molecular biology, genetics, natural history and medical science.

 

"I really have to say these are relatively neutral images even if I use information that tends to make people feel uncomfortable. But I don't see that as negative. I try to show things that are obviously familiar but also inform them with as much cultural and scientific history as I can, so that they are credible.

"The stuff that may not be noticed - for instance the geometry of the landscape in 'The Farm'- to me is far more scary than an albino hairless mouse with cartilage growing on its back. I am also trying to make an emotionally resonant image that reaches people. I try to make it as credible as possible without making it boring."

Alexis is aware of the political power of his work. As an American, he believes he is well placed to bring attention to the consequences of his homeland's environmental, economic and political policies.

"I am of a generation whose relationship with the government and big business comes out of a post-Watergate scepticism. How could my work not have a political effect? I feel like I am in such a privileged position I would find it unconscionable if I didn't take advantage of that as someone who cares about these issues."

Collectively, the paintings presented in 'Wonderful World' offer a graphic vision of a bio-engineered near future in which human and animal bodies, crops and plants have been genetically altered to suit a variety of needs - whether commercial, aesthetic, medical or gastronomic.

Despite the potentially complex nature of the exhibition he makes a point of not being elitist, as his subject is something that touches every person on the planet.

"I don't expect anyone to know anything. That is why I am a populist. If I have a show and people from different demographics come to find out about global warming, I don't want to lose half of my audience due to my arrogance. It has to be decipherable to a six-year-old child. I try to construct it as an onion with different layers of meaning and iconography."

The negative consequences of industrial and technological progress are rarely addressed in a modern culture fuelled by the products of multinational entertainment conglomerates. Alexis' paintings hang out on the edge of complacency, forcing us to confront a vision of the future implicit in the choices we, as a society, make today.

 

This weeks show is dedicated to the memory of Penny Zeidman.

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/chicagotribune/obituary.aspx?n=penny-zeidman&pid=146134890

 

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_269-Alexis_Rockman.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:42am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 268: Stan Shellabarger and Dutes Miller/ Courntey Fink & Art Publishing Now

This week: Amanda and Patricia have a .... spirited....discussion with two of BAS's favorite artists (and the greatest oversight in our interview history until now) Stan Shellabarger and Dutes Miller. Go see their show, it's awesome!

Next, Brian and Duncan talk to Courtney Fink of Art Publishing Now while at Southern Exposure.

Did we really get the "bums rush" from the Propellor fund, oh yes we did!

 

Lifted relevant info:


Art Publishing Now is a two-day event dedicated to the investigation and showcasing of art publishing practices in the Bay Area. It includes a day of presentations and critical discussions, an after-party, an art publishers fair, library and archive.

 

Western Exhibitions is pleased to present an exhibition by husband-and-husband artist team Miller & Shellabarger. The show opens on Friday, October 15 with a reception, from 5 to 8pm, which is free and open to the public.

This second showing at Western Exhibitions of Miller & Shellabarger's collaborative pursuits will focus on works from several inter-related projects including Volume 6 of their large-scale silhouette artist books, documents from a recent performance involving funeral pyres and intimate, discrete objects that utilize embroidery and carved shells.

The silhouette is a key component in several of these new works. Miller & Shellabarger first employed silhouettes in large-scale artist books that contained their individual profiles, each one cut by the other. We will show the most recent book in this series as well as other silhouette-based works that use the silhouette as a starting point, including conjoined beard silhouette collages traced by friends and two embossed lead pieces that feature similar imagery. We will also show larger-than-life, phantasmagorical images, created during their  "Summer Studio" artist residency at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago's Sullivan Galleries in 2010 which take advantage of the distortions of the silhouetted figure in light and shadow. Life-size body tracings of each other are realized in large drawings on paper made with gunpowder, and in a small book of photographs of body tracings made with seeds.

Additional work will include a twin set of pillowcases, each monogrammed with their initials using hair from their beards as thread, a delicate cameo depicting the two with their beards intertwined carved out of sardonic shell by an Italian master carver, and photographs from a recent performance "Untitled (Pyre)" where they found two naturally fallen trees in the forest, chopped them, and stacked the fireplace-sized pieces into roughly human-size forms, and burned these pyres at dusk.

Miller & Shellabarger are a 2009 recipient of the Peter S. Reed Foundation Grant, 2008 recipient of an Artadia Award, and a 2007 recipient of a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation award. Their work is in the collections of the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art and the National Gallery of Canada in Ontario. In 2010 they showed a major selection of work at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Portland, Maine, participated in the Time-Based Arts (TBA) festival in Portland, Oregon and will have a solo exhibition in 2011 at the Illinois State University Galleries in Normal, Illinois. Their work has been written about in Artforum.com, Art & Auction, Frieze, Artnet, The Art Newspaper, Flash Art, TimeOut Chicago, and the Chicago Sun-Times. Dutes Miller and Stan Shellabarger also maintain separate artistic practices. They live and work in Chicago.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_268-Stan_and_Dutes.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:54pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 267: James Elkins and the Stone Summer Theory Institute

This week: Duncan talks to Professor James Elkins about the Stone Summer Theory Institute and this years theme Beyond the Aesthetic and the Anti-Aesthetic.

The Stone Summer Theory Institute is week-long school in contemporary art theory. It is held in Chicago, in July, at the School of the Art Institute.

Each year brings together an unprecedented gathering of international scholars to discuss an unresolved question in contemporary art theory. This year's subject is the aesthetic and one of its opposites, the anti-aesthetic. Some art practices aim at aesthetic value, while other art practices aim to do something in society, in politics, or to identity. The difference between those two conceptions of art is one of the deepest unresolved questions of current art practice.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_267-James_Elkins.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:50pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 266: Art Book Swap with Regency Arts Press/ Wexner Center with Christopher Bedford

This week: Amanda and Tom talk to Heathers Hubbs (director of NADA) and Lauren Wittels (Executive Director, Regency Arts Press, Ltd.) about the press, their projects and the forthcoming Art Book Swap (Saturday October 9th, 2010 12-5 at the AIC's Regenstein Library)!

Next: Duncan (in our first official phone interview) talks to Christopher Bedford, Curator of Exhibitions at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus Ohio.

DONATE BOOKS! COME TO THE SWAP!

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_266-Book_Swap-Wexner.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:18pm EDT

This week: San Francisco checks in and talks to curator and art historian Abby Chen!

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_265-Abby_Chen.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:07am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 264: Wendy White

This week on the Amanda Browder show, Amanda and her trusty side kick Tom visit Wendy White's Brooklyn studio. The discuss Wendy's paintings as she finishes up a bunch for her current exhibition at Andrew Rafacz gallery in Chicago. Amanda finally finds a painter that she likes in Wendy and Tom learns that Amanda is not a sculptor (as he had believed), but she in fact works in a new genre (to Tom) called "Fibers".


Wendy White is a New York painter who has shown all over the world, including recent shows in New York, Madrid, Amsterdam, Tokyo, and even Omaha! Her work has been discussed and reviewed extensively by the art intelligencia in such publications as ArtForum, Art in America, The Brooklyn Rail, the Huffington Post and the Gay City News.

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_264-Wendy_White.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:00pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 263: Kehinde Wiley

This week: Duncan, Richard and guest co-host Dr. Amy Mooney, Associate Professor of Art History at Columbia College, talk with superstar artist Kehinde Wiley about his work and his exhibition "The World Stage: India-Sri Lanka" which just opened at the Rhona Hoffman Gallery (through October 23, 2010).

 

The following seemingly outdated bio was lifted from the New Museum of Contemporary Art.

Kehinde Wiley was born in Los Angeles in 1977. He received his BFA in 1999 from the San Francisco Art Institute and graduated from Yale University School of Art two years later. Wiley is viewed as the modern-day heir to a long line of portraitists --Reynolds, Gainsborough, Titian, Tiepolo-- from whom he appropriates the symbols and visual language of heroism, power, and opulence in his realistic renderings of urban black men. While referencing specific old master paintings and fusing period elements-- French Rococo ornamentation, Islamic architecture, West African textile design-- into his portraits, the final works convey a very urban, contemporary aesthetic because of the subjects portrayed and their hip-hop influenced attire. Wiley succeeds in his intent to blur the boundaries between traditional and present-day modes of representation, as he says to "quote historical sources and position young black men within that field of power."

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_263-Kehinde_Wiley.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:56pm EDT

This week: Brian sits down with Ava Jancar and Eric Jones of Jancar Jones galley in San Francisco. They discuss their peculiar gallery space, what it is like to be a young art dealer after the financial meltdown, and the future of the contemporary art scene. Enjoy!

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_262-Jancar_Jones.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 2:35pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 261: Jitish Kallat

This Week: Our sixth season kicks off with a great interview with artist Jitish Kallat. We talk about his work, his installation at the Art Institute, and what it is like to live and work in an art scene in a city with 14 million people. If that weren't enough, curator Dr. Madhuvanti Ghose chimes in as well!

The following shameless lifted from the AIC web site:

Public Notice 3

September 11, 2010–January 2, 2011

Grand Staircase

Overview: In the first major presentation in an American museum of Jitish Kallat’s work, the contemporary Indian artist has designed a site-specific installation that connects two key historical moments—the First World Parliament of Religions held on September 11, 1893, and the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on that very date, 108 years later. The resulting work, Public Notice 3, creates a trenchant commentary on the evolution, or devolution, of religious tolerance across the 20th and 21st centuries.

The basis for Kallat’s installation is a landmark speech delivered by Swami Vivekananda at the Parliament, which was held in conjunction with the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in what is now the museum’s Fullerton Hall. The Parliament was the earliest attempt to create a global dialogue of religious faiths, and Vivekananda, eloquently addressing its 7,000 attendees, argued for an end of fanaticism and a respectful recognition of all traditions of belief through universal tolerance.

With Public Notice 3, Kallat converts Vivekananda’s text to LED displays on each of the 118 risers of the historic Woman’s Board Grand Staircase of the Art Institute of Chicago, adjacent to the site of Vivekananda’s original address. Drawing attention to the great chasm between this speech of tolerance and the very different events of September 11, 2001, the text of the speech will be displayed in the colors of the United States’ Department of Homeland Security alert system. Opening on September 11, Public Notice 3 explores the possibility of revisiting the historical speech as a site of contemplation, symbolically refracting it with threat codes devised by a government to deal with this terror-infected era of religious factionalism and fanaticism.

Curator: Dr. Madhuvanti Ghose, Marilynn Alsdorf Curator of Indian and Islamic Art.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_261-Jitish_Kallat.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:33pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 260: When I'm Five

The five year behemoth is upon us! Episode 260 kicks off with a discussion with Mary Jane Jacob and Michelle Grabner about the artist and studio. Then we turn the camera on ourselves and have a discussion about where we are and where we are headed, if anywhere.

Thanks for listening! It has been a great five years!

 

P.S. Cauleen S. you are a sad, sad, petty whiner. Grow the hell up.

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_260-When_Im_Five.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:35pm EDT

This week: Tom and Amanda talk to NYC based painters Aaron Johnson and Ryan Schneider.


BAS sends mucho congratulations to the MacKenzie family.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_259-Johnson-Schneider.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:36pm EDT

This week: We talk to Artist Nathan Carter who has a work in the current MCA Exhibition “Alexander Calder and Contemporary Art: Form, Balance, Joy”about his work, the youth perspective, and the secret trasmissions of numbers stations.

Here is a slightly outdated bio I lifted: Nathan Carter’s wall reliefs, sculptures, collages, and hanging objects are inspired by myriad aspects of contemporary society: modes of transportation, mass communication devices, sports insignias, and architecture for mass gatherings like stadiums and parade grounds. At once gestural and reductive, his works amplify strategies first explored by modernist artists in the early 20th century. Deeply rooted in a fascination with how visual abstract codes represent a means of abbreviated, if not universal, communication, Carter’s free-form compositions are simultaneously non-objective and referential.

Playful at first impression, Carter’s art contains allusions to mundane yet foreboding engagements, such as radio transmissions, encoded transcriptions, and other electronic communications that serve not only to link us to world networks, but also to place us under surveillance and deprive us of our privacy. Often our dependence on these tools and the despair that results from their failure to properly operate is a recurring leitmotif in his work.

Nathan Carter was born in Dallas, TX, in 1970 and currently lives and works in New York, NY. He received his MFA from Yale University, New Haven, CT, in 1999. He has had solo exhibitions at Galería Pilar Parra, Madrid (2007); Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York (2006, 2004, 2001); and Esther Schipper, Berlin (2006). He also participated in Art 33 Basel, Basel, Switzerland (2002). Selected group exhibitions include Neo Baroque, DA2 Centre of Contemporary Art of Salamanca, Spain (2005-06); Greater New York 2005, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, NY; and GNS, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2003).

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_258-Nathan_Carter.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:15am EDT

This week: Something for everyone! Lori Waxman and Duncan do reviews. Terri and Joanna review "The Ask" by Sam Lipsyte. Duncan and Richard talk with Michael Perry the Marketing & Programming Project Coordinator
for the Chicago Loop Alliance about Art Loop Open among loads of other things.


The outro is a rare piece of unedited, pure, unadulterated Duncan. Stick around for it.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_257-Bento_Box_oart.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:28pm EDT

This week: Brian and Patricia sit down with Andrew McKinley, proprietor of Adobe Books Backroom Gallery, and Devon Bella, the gallery's current director. They discuss Adobe Books' seminal place in the San Francisco art community, the Mission School, the gallery's recent renovation, and the ominous installation in the window proclaiming "Everything Must Go!"

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_256-Adobe_Books.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:29pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 255: Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

This week: Philip von Zweck (Bad mofo, artist, and storied, long running host of Something Else on WLUW) and Simon Anderson (Associate Professor Department of Art History, Theory + Criticismm SAIC) interview a living legend, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge. Breyer P-Orridge was in town for an exhibition S/he is having at Western Exhibitions.

 

Genesis P-Orridge and performance artist Lady Jaye Breyer began a collaborative effort begun in 1993  that focused on a single, central concern: deconstructing the fiction of self.  Frustrated by what they felt to be culturally enforced limits on identity but emboldened by the radical power of love, P-Orridge and Lady Jaye applied collage and cut-up techniques to their own bodies in an effort to merge their respective selves.  Through plastic surgery, hormone therapy, cross-dressing and altered behavior, they fashioned a single, pandrogynous being, Breyer P-Orridge.  The work is an experiment in identity, a test of how fully two people can integrate their lives, and, ultimately, a symbolic gesture of evolution and the alchemical union of the male and female halves of the human.  Although Lady Jaye passed away in 2007, Genesis has continued Breyer P-Orridge, putting into question not only the limits between self and other but also life and death.

 

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge was born in Manchester, England in 1950. S/he was a member of the Kinetic action group Exploding Galaxy/Transmedia Exploration from 1969-1970. S/he conceived of and founded the seminal British performance art group Coum Transmissions in 1969 and was the co-founder of Throbbing Gristle, Psychic TV, and the spoken word/ambient music performance group Thee Majesty. Throughout Genesis' long career, s/he has worked and collaborated with William S. Burroughs, Brion Gysin, Derek Jarman and Dr. Timothy Leary, among others. H/er art has been exhibited internationally, including recent exhibitions at Deitch Projects, Mass MOCA, Centre Pompidou, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Barbican Museum, the Swiss Institute and White Columns, amongst others. Upcoming exhibitions will include a solo exhibition at Rupert Goldsworthy in Berlin, a keynote address at the Erotic Screens Conference, Centre for Public Culture and Ideas at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia and a lecture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York in March. H/er archive was recently acquired for the permanent collection of the Tate Britain Museum. 

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_255-Genesis_Breyer_P-Orridge.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:48am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 254: Jen Delos Reyes and Harrell Fletcher

This week: Our Open Engagement series draws to a close with an interview with conference organizers Jen Delos Reyes and Harrell Fletcher.

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_254-Delos_Reyes-Fletcher.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:12pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 253: Nils Norman

This week: We talk with artist and visionary Nils Norman.

Nils Norman was born in Kent, England in 1966. He studied fine Art Painting BA Hons at St. Martins School of Art in London. After graduating in 1989 he moved to Cologne, Germany. There he lived for three years and collaborated with the artists Stephan Dillemuth and Josef Strau at their experimental storefront project Friesenwall 120, during this time Norman also set up a small gallery space in London, which later became Milch. In Cologne Norman worked for one year assisting the German painter Gerhard Richter in his atelier.

His first US exhibition was at the Pat Hearn Gallery in Chelsea (with Denis Balk and Simon Leung), after which he began to be represented by the late Colin Deland at American Fine Arts.

Norman founded an experimental space called Poster Studio on Charing Cross Road, London. This space was a collaborative effort with Merlin Carpenter and Dan Mitchell. In 1998 in New York he set up Parasite, together with the artist Andrea Fraser, a collaborative artist led initiative that developed an archive for site-specific projects.

Norman now lives and works in London. He exhibits internationally in commercial galleries, museum, and in public and alternative spaces. He writes articles, designs book covers and posters, collaborates with other artists, teaches and lectures in European and the US. Norman completed a major design project: an 80m pedestrian bridge and two islands for Roskilde Commune in Denmark in 2005 and is now working together with Nicholas Hare Architects on a school playground project for the new Golden Lane Campus, East London. He has recently finished an artist residency at the University of Chicago, Chicago, USA.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_253-Nils_Norman.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:23pm EDT

As part of the ongoing collaboration between Bad At Sports and Art Practical, as well as the summer series exploring social practice, this week Brian Andrews and Patricia Maloney sit down with Natasha Wheat as she prepares for her upcoming exhibition and temporary restaurant “Self Contained,” which opens at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago on July 13.

 

 

Currently based in San Francisco, Wheat is an American artist whose work attempts to understand and interrupt the way that human beings exist together. She is interested in the social hierarchy of space, utopian attempts, and the tension between exclusivity and inclusion. Wheat founded Project Grow (http://www.growinginalldirections.org/), a Portland Oregon based Art Studio and Urban Farming Project that includes people with mental diversity. Her recent work examines agriculture in relationship to human culture, distribution, and control. She received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2008.

 

Wheat has exhibited collaboratively and individually at The UC Berkeley Art Museum; The Pete and Susan Barrett Gallery, Santa Monica; Rogaland Kunstsenter, Stavanger, Norway; G2, Mess Hall, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.

 

Check out the text version of this interview, starting July 1, in Issue 18 of Art Practical. http://www.artpractical.com 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_252-Natasha_Wheat.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30pm EDT

This week: We talk to artist Mark Dion, about social practice, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, cabinets of curiosity. The word "taxonomy" is bandied about at great length.

Mark Dion was born in 1961 in Massachusetts; he lives and works in Pennsylvania.

Dion is known for making art out of fieldwork, incorporating elements of biology, archaeology, ethnography, and the history of science, and applying to his artwork methodologies generally used for pure science. Traveling the world and collaborating with a wide range of scientists, artists, and museums, Dion has excavated ancient and modern artifacts from the banks of the Thames in London, established a marine life laboratory using specimens from New York’s Chinatown, and created a contemporary cabinet of curiosities exploring natural and philosophical hierarchies. His approach emphasizes illustration and accuracy but is charged with a biting undertone. Dion has a longstanding interest in exploring how ideas about natural history are visualized and how they circulate in society. Dion’s work has been presented at many U.S. and international museums and galleries, including solo exhibitions at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver; Galleria Emi Fontana, Milan; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York; and Deutsches Museum, Bonn. Dion has been commissioned to create works for Aldrich Museum of Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut; the Tate Gallery, London; the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco; and The Museum of Modern Art, New York.


Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_251-Mark_Dion.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:30pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 250: Nato Thompson This week: Holy bicenquinquagenary Batman! Brian and Duncan (and guest stars including but not limited to Randall Szott) talk to Creative Time chief curator, author, and all around interesting guest Nato Thompson. This show is the second in the series of interviews recorded at the Open Engagement conference at which Mr. Thompson was a guest. This series already charts among some of my favorites in the history of the show. Enjoy!

Since January 2007, Nato has organized major projects for Creative Time such as Democracy in America: The National Campaign (2008), Paul ChanÂ’s acclaimed Waiting for Godot in New Orleans (2007) and Mike Nelson’s A Psychic Vacuum. Previous to Creative Time, he worked as Curator at MASS MoCA where he completed numerous large-scale exhibitions such as The Interventionists: Art in the Social Sphere (2004), a survey of political art of the 1990s with a catalogue distributed by MIT Press. His writings have appeared in numerous publications including BookForum, Art Journal, tema celeste, Parkett, Cabinet and The Journal of Aesthetics and Protest. The College Art Association awarded him for distinguished writing in Art Journal in 2004. He recently curated an exhibition for Independent Curators International titled Experimental Geography with a book available by Melville House Publishing. His book on art and activism is due out by Autonomedia in October 2009.


Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_250-Nato_Thompson.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:51am EDT

This week: The first in our series of interviews from the Open Engagement conference that took place in Portland this past May. We start off with an excellent discussion that Randall Szott, Duncan, Brian and the occasional Incubate person had with artist, writer, lemon tormentor Ted Purves. Topics include; Ted's work, the past present and future of Social Practice and what it means to be an artist today.

This series of interviews (thusfar, I've only gone through the first two) are some of my favorite discussions that (the royal) we have had in the 5 years of the show. Great stuff!

Ted Purves is a writer and artist based in Oakland. His public projects and curatorial works are centered on investigating the practice of art in the world, particularly as it addresses issues of localism, democratic participation, and innovative shifts in the position of the audience. His two-year project, Temescal Amity Works, created in collaboration with Susanne Cockrell and based in the Temescal neighborhood of Oakland, facilitated and documented the exchange of backyard produce and finished its public phase in winter 2007. His collaborative project Momentary Academy, a free school taught by artists over a period of 10 weeks, was featured in Bay Area Now 4 in 2005 at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco.

Ted recently received a visual arts grant from the Creative Capital Foundation and a Creative Work Fund grant from the Elise and Walter Haas Foundation.

His book, What We Want Is Free: Generosity and Exchange in Recent Art, was published by State University of New York Press in 2005.


The Open Engagement conference is an initiative of Portland State University’s Art and Social Practice MFA concentration and co-sponsored by Portland Community College and the MFA in Visual Studies program at Pacific Northwest College of Art and supported by the Cyan PDX Cultural Residency Program. Directed by Jen Delos Reyes and planned in conjunction with Harrell Fletcher and the Portland State University MFA Monday Night Lecture Series, this conference features three nationally and internationally renowned artists: Mark Dion, Amy Franceschini, and Nils Norman. The conference will showcase work by Temporary Services, InCUBATE, and a new project by Mark Dion created in collaboration with students from the PSU Art and Social Practice concentration.

The artists involved in Open Engagement: Making Things, Making Things Better, Making Things Worse, challenge our traditional ideas of what art is and does. These artist’s projects mediate the contemporary frameworks of art as service, as social space, as activism, as interactions, and as relationships, and tackle subject matter ranging from urban planning, alternative pedagogy, play, fiction, sustainability, political conflict and the social role of the artist.

Can socially engaged art do more harm than good? Are there ethical responsibilities for social art? Does socially engaged art have a responsibility to create public good? Can there be transdisciplinary approaches to contemporary art making that would contribute to issues such as urban planning and sustainability?

Open Engagement is a free conference May 14-17, 2010, in Portland, Oregon. This annual conference will be a focal point of a new low residency Art and Social Practice MFA that PSU hopes to launch in Fall of 2010.

This years conference will host over 100 artists, activists, curators, scholars, writers, farmers, community organizers, film makers and collectives including: Nato Thompson, The Watts House Project, Linda Weintraub, Ted Purves, Henry Jenkins, Wealth Underground Farms, Brian Collier, Anne E. Moore, David Horvitz, Chen Tamir, and Parfyme.


Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_249-Ted_Purves.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:30pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 248: Shannon Stratton and Judith Leeman This week: Brian Andrews and Duncan MacKenzie check in with Judith
Leeman and Shannon Stratton while visiting Portland, Oregon and discuss their
most recent curatorial endeavor the "Gestures of Resistance" exhibition at Portland's
Museum of Contemporary Craft.  We talk about problematizing the standard static exhibition,
how a viewer can access a dynamic and evolving show, what an object be
"loaded" with, and the problem with placards.

The exhibition includes...

Sara Black and John Preus, Anthea Black, Carol Lung, Cat Mazza, Mung
Lar Lam, Ehren Tool, and Theaster Gates.

Links...

http://www.performingcraft.com/

http://www.shannonstratton.com/

http://three-walls.org/

http://www.judithleemann.com/

http://material-exchange.org/home.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tfi3DIlaXqg

http://www.fraufiber.com/

http://www.post-craft.net/catmazza.htm

http://www.munglarlam.com/

http://www.bquayartgallery.com/archive/access_tool2007.html

http://theastergates.com/home.html

http://www.museumofcontemporarycraft.org/
Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_248-Stratton-Leeman.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:00pm EDT

This week: The third in the lecture series that was in conjunction with the Bad at Sports organized exhibition “Don't Piss on Me and Tell Me it's Raining”. Tom and Amanda talk to Bridget Elmer and Emily Larned of Impractical Labor in Service of the Speculative Arts.

Founded by two letterpress printers, Impractical Labor in Service of the Speculative Arts (ILSSA). ILSSA is a membership organization for those who make conceptual or experimental work with obsolete technology. Consisting of a Union and a Research Institute, ILSSA seeks to build community and create resources, promoting the creative re-use of discarded innovations and the values embedded within them. Since its inception in 2008, ILSSA has grown to over 100 members, including a social sculpture weaver, a clip art librarian, a blogger who posts in needlepoint, a designer/builder of vacuum tube electronics, and an heirloom farmer. On this evening with the use of an overhead projector and a portable anachronistic sound system, the ILSSA co-operators will provide an overview of the organization, its activities and members, and the philosophy behind their collective interests.

 

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_247-ILSSA.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:54pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 246: Steven Rand This week, Duncan, Amanda and Tom talk to artist Steven Rand, who is the founder and Executive Director of apexart in New York.

If you are in or around NYC this is the last week of "Don't Piss On Me and Tell Me It's Raining" the Bad at Sports organized show, go check it out while you still can!
Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_246-Steven_Rand.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:30pm EDT

This week: Painters/Painting (aka "The Painters of Painting") recorded at apexart in late April as a part of the BAS organized exhibition which runs through May 22.

 

Painter and Bad @ Sports NYC correspondent, Tom Sanford will moderate a panel of 5 other painters who will talk about painting. Kamrooz Aram, Holly Coulis, David Humphrey, Dike Blair and Deborah Kass not only represent three or four generations of New York painters and are all prominent voices among their cohort, but also represent a wide variety of approaches to the medium. These, "the Painters of Painting", will discuss the current concerns in painting as well as painting's enduring relevance as a humanistic and idiosyncratic antidote to the prevailing corporate culture of consensus and commodification.


Tom's wrap up e-mail sent to all involved afterwards-


 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Sanford
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2010 7:13 AM
To: Tom Sanford
Subject: Thanks from PAINTERS/PAINTING

 

Hi Guys

 

I just wanted to send y'all a note to thank the many many of you who 

came out to the panel and offer my apologies to those who weren't 

able to get in! I am so sorry that a super turnout put apexart in the 

position that they had no choice but to not allow a few people in. It 

was totally packed inside - i actually had an audience member sitting 

on my lap for most of the talk. But thank you all ever so much for 

making the effort, i sincerely appreciate the overwhelming show of 

interest!

 

The incredible turn out certainly speaks to the great enthusiasm for 

painting in the medium's global capitol city and I think the talk was 

a success. The panelists (David, Deb, Holly, Dike & Kamroos) were 

charming and interesting and insightful, i did my best to keep us on 

course, and Steven Rand and the apexart crew (Cybele, Julia & Julien) 

were gracious and generous hosts.

 

Best of all the audience has plenty of great questions comments and 

the occasional well timed out-burst! Special thanks to for really 

great questions and comments from Daniel Davidson, Alfred Steiner, 

Michael Anderson, Carlos Fragoso, and George Rodart among others 

whose names I didn't know - great hustle guys!

 

Anyway, thanks a million for all of your support and interest and 

remember the most important thing is to keep those brushes wet - and 

Michael Anderson pointed out with the optimism that we all share for 

painting and picture making "There are about 9 million new kinds of 

paintings yet to be made!!"

 

Cheers

Tom

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_245-BAS_painting_panel.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:20pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 244: Nathaniel Stern This week: Duncan talks to artist/educator/agitator Nathaniel Stern.

Nathaniel Stern (USA / South Africa, born 1977) is an experimental installation and video artist, net.artist, printmaker and writer. He has produced and collaborated on projects ranging from interactive and immersive environments, networked art and multimedia physical theater performances, to digital printing and collage, stone lithography and slam poetry. He’s won many awards, fellowships, commissions and residencies between South Africa, America, and all over Europe. Nathaniel holds a design degree from Cornell University, studio-based Masters in art from the Interactive Telecommunications Program (NYU), and research PhD from Trinity College Dublin. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art and Design at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee.

Nathaniel has held solo exhibitions at the Johannesburg Art Gallery, the Johnson Museum of Art, the Museum of Wisconsin Art, the University of the Witwatersrand, and several commercial and experimental galleries throughout the US, South Africa and Ireland. His work has been shown at festivals, galleries and museums internationally, including the Venice Biennale, Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art, South African National Gallery, Kunsthalle Exnergasse, International Print Center New York, Milwaukee Art Museum, Modern and Contemporary Art Center (Hungary) and Grahamstown National Arts Festival (South Africa). Public collections include the Johannesburg Art Gallery, The Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media (Cornell University), turbulence.org, Contemporary Irish Art Society, and the Universities of South Africa (UNISA) and the Witwatersrand; he is in private collections all over the world. Recent features on Nathaniel’s work can be seen in the Leonardo Journal of Art, Science and Technology, Leonardo Electronic Almanac, NY Arts and Art South Africa magazines, Rhizome.org, PBS.org, the Wall Street Journal and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.


Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_244-Nathaniel_Stern.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 243: The Present Group

This week Brian sits down with Eleanor Hanson and Oliver Wise, the Oakland-based founders of The Present Group, who describe the project as “like a mutual fund that produces art instead of profits.”; A quarterly art subscription project, The Present Group enables a community of subscribers to create a new avenue of support for contemporary artists. They produce thought-provoking work in a variety of media, and each of the four annual limited editioned art works is paired with an essay contextualizing the edition.

 

Their goal is to engage art enthusiasts who never thought of themselves as art collectors and to introduce them to the experience and pleasures of owning contemporary art. This is the next installment of the collaboration between Art Practical and Bad At Sports.

 

An abridged transcript of this interview appears in AP Issue 13.

 

http://www.artpractical.com

 

Image: David Horvitz. Hermosa Beach, CA, Issue 9, Winter 2009; viewmaster reel, viewer, and Somerset cotton rag paper card. Courtesy of The Present Group.

 

A note from BAS: Libsyn, our hosting company, sucks like space. We are looking for suggestions on other hosting services so we can get far away from these jerks. 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_243-The_Present_Group.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:19pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 242: Julia Fish

This week: Richard and Duncan speak with Chicago based artist and 2010 Whitney Biennial participant Julia Fish about her work, Japanese architecture and more!

Before that starts, there is a short pithy segment on C2E2, which was awesome (the show not our bit).

Yes I made a stupid Front 242 musical joke which only I will find funny.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_242-Julia_Fish.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:51pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 241: Jeffrey Deitch interviewed by Carlo McCormick

This week Jeffrey Deitch!!! Recorded before a live studio audience at the BAS apexart show with special help from Carlo McCormick.

Carlo McCormick is a leading New York art writer and a champion of "the downtown scene". For almost decades Jeffrey Deitch has been perhaps the most important taste maker and facilitator of emerging contemporary art in New York City and the world. On the eve of Deitch's departure from New York, Carlo will talk to Jeffrey about his time and legacy as one of the most visible, dynamic and controversial players in the the New York art world.

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_241-Jeffrey_Deitch.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:04pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 240: Peter Otto

This week: HOLY CRAP OUR SHOW AT apexart OPENS!!! April 7th 6-8 p.m. http://www.apexart.org/exhibitions/badatsports.htm.

Also this week: Duncan talks to Peter Otto!

Peter Otto’s work reports on the constituent factors of a human condition continually shifting between beguiling and highly disturbing. He reveals the state to which humanity – ever tested by social, cultural and political forces – bends, breaks and at times collapses. His paintings and sculptures show a reality emerging from the darkest moments. The themes are somber; the work though is delicately formed and teeming with graceful facture.

Otto, who lives in Arnhem, The Netherlands, has been featured in solo and group exhibitions throughout Europe including projects at Museum Beelden aan Zee in Scheveningen, the Kröller-Müller Museum, Boÿmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam, Galerie Reuten and Galerie Swart in Amsterdam, the Museum Kurhaus Kleve and the Pushkin Museum in Moscow.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_240-Peter_Otto.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:07pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 239: Mads Lynnerup

This week: Patricia sits down with artist Mads Lynnerup during his recent sojourn in San Francisco.  They talk about spotting Cyndi Lauper at the New Museum, precocious nerdy kids at the Guggenheim, navigating the ever-growing professionalization of the art world, everyday routines, and the merits of being a prankster.

Mad Lynnerup was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and lives and works in Copenhagen and New York. He completed his MFA from Columbia University in 2007 and received a BFA from San Francisco Art Institute in 2001. He has shown his work at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; The Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; P.S. 1 and Socrates Sculpture Park, both New York; and Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw. Lynnerup works across such diverse media as video, sculpture, drawing, and printmaking. Many of the themes in his work have roots in his constant interest in the everyday and his surroundings.

This is the third collaboration between Art Practical and Bad At Sports.

Image: Routines (Sønder Boulevard), 2008 (video still); installation, video and poster series. Courtesy of the Artist and Baer Ridgeway Exhibitions, San Francisco.

Links:

www.artpractical.com

http://www.artpractical.com/feature/interview_with_mads_lynnerup/

http://www.madslynnerup.com/

 

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_239-Mads_Lynnerup_.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:05am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 238: Amy Franceschini

This week: Duncan talks to Amy Franceschini.

Amy Franceschini is an artist and educator whose work has at its core cross-disciplinary research with a focus on how humans impact the world we inhabit. Her work encourages new formats of exchange and production, many times in collaboration with other practitioners. These works often provide a playful entry point and tools for an audience to gain insight into a deeper field of inquiry – not only to imagine, but to participate in and initiate change in the places we live.  Amy founded the artists’ collective and design studio, Futurefarmers, in 1995 and Free Soil in 2004. Her solo and collaborative work have been in international exhibitions at ZKM, Whitney Museum, the New York Museum of Modern Art and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. She received her BFA from San Francisco State University, MFA from Stanford University, and is currently an Assistant Professor of Art + Architecture at University of San Francisco and visiting artist at California College of the Arts. She is the recipient of the Artadia, Cultural Innovation, Eureka Fellowship, Creative Capital and SFMOMA SECA Awards.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_238-Amy_Franceschini.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:53pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 237: Andreas Fischer

This week: Philip von Zweck talks to Andreas Fischer!

Andreas Fischer is a Chicago-based painter and Assistant Professor of Painting and Drawing at Illinois State University (Normal,IL). Over the past ten years, his work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in New York and Chicago, including a 12 × 12 solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. He received a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, an MFA and MA in Art History from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and studied at the Universität der Künste Berlin. He was awarded an Artadia artist grant in 2004 and his most recent exhibition were held at Hudson Franklin Gallery (New York), Gahlberg Gallery (Glen Ellyn) and the Hyde Park Art Center.

 

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_237-Andreas_Fischer.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:06pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 236: Curtis Mann

This week: Duncan talks to 2010 Whitney Biennial participant and decontructivist photography raconteur, Curtis Mann.

 

Send us your video questions for the art world!!!

 

 

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_236-Curtis_Mann.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:53am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 235: Michelle Blade

This week: Brian and Patricia sat down with Oakland-based artist Michelle Blade on February 20 in her storefront studio, which is also the location of Sight School, http://sightschool.wordpress.com/, the alternative space she created in 2009 to encourage dialogue around the connections between art and life. It was the day following the opening for her solo exhibition, “Blow As Deep As You Want to Blow,” on view at Triple Base gallery http://basebasebase.com in San Francisco through March 21. Their conversation tackled a range of topics, from the economic realities that perennially plague artists in the Bay Area to the pleasures of walking across a painting. This is the second collaboration between Art Practical http://www.artpractical.com/ and Bad At Sports. Image: Music from the Mountaintops, 2010 (still). Courtesy of the Artist.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_235-Michelle_Blade.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 2:35am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 234: NADA 4 Awai/Blass

This week: The final report from NADA 2009! Duncan and Amanda talk to artists Nicole Awai, and Valerie Blass.

This weeks intro contains lots of important information. Bad at Sports needs your help with an exciting new project. If you have a question you want answered related to the art world, we'll get you answers!

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_234-NADA_part_4.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:05am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 233: East of Borneo/Book Review

This week: The Amanda Browder show talks to Thomas Lawson and Stacey Allen about the new art journal East of Borneo.

 

Then Terri and Joanna discuss  Gail Carriger's novel "Soulless".

 

ALSO PLEASE HELP US OUT!!! Post a video question for our new project! Duncan details in the BAS announcement section of the show.

 

Los Angeles, CA, September 30--Set to launch in spring 2010, East of Borneo is a dynamic and extensive website: part art journal, part multi-media archive edited by Thomas Lawson, Dean of California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) School of Art. This far-reaching publishing project will also include an imprint of highly focused books that reconsider neglected material and provocative themes within a contemporary context.

The development and launch of East of Borneo, signals the amicable end to CalArts' productive eight year collaboration with Afterall. Under Lawson's co-editorship, the contemporary art journal was produced in partnership with London's Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design.

In an interview earlier this week, Lawson said, "As the internet forces radical change on all forms of publishing it has become ever clearer that all but the most entrenched art magazines are at risk of becoming obsolete in their current forms. The interesting and exciting thing about this is the potential the web opens up for those of us who want to push forward. As we envisage East of Borneo we will be able to offer readers and writers a much richer, and much more valuable and highly personalized, experience than print formats can. And editorially we will also be able to explore more fully our roots in Los Angeles, while maintaining very active links to the rest of the world."

East of Borneo presents traditional art writing in all its variations--from personal to academic, poetic to theoretical--while providing a multi-media platform that highlights connections and encourages new lines of thought, research and consideration, as well as expanded forms of writing. With its robust web architecture and non-hierarchical editorial approach, East of Borneo reflects the sprawling, rhizomatic nature of Los Angeles as well as the broader, international art world.

Afterall 22, the last issue of the journal co-published with CalArts, is due on newsstands in October and will feature texts on the artists Sheela Gowda, Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys and the artists' group Art Club 2000.

Thomas Lawson is an artist, educator and writer. His essays have appeared in such journals as Artforum, Art in America, Flash Art, frieze and October, as well as numerous exhibition catalogues. From 1979 until 1992 he, along with writer Susan Morgan, published and edited REALLIFE Magazine, an irregular publication by and about younger artists interested in the relationship between art and life. A selection of writings from REALLIFE was published by Primary Information in 2006. For East of Borneo, he is joined by Stacey Allan, a writer and curator who was the Los Angeles-based associate editor of Afterall from 2007-2009. Lawson and Allan are working, on this new venture, with a highly experienced team of web developers, freelance editors and contributors based both in Los Angeles and abroad.

East of Borneo is published by the California Institute of the Arts, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, and is supported in part by grants from the Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts and the J. Paul Getty Foundation.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_233-East_of_Borneo.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:42pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 232: Picturing the Studio

This week Duncan and Richard talk to Michelle Grabner and Annika Marie about Picturing the Studio and among other things whether or not anyone does four studio visits a day. Go check out the show, even the art I disliked was interesting.

Lifted from SAIC:

This exhibition explores the richly complex politically- and psychologicaly-charged notion of the artist's studio today. With works by over 30 artists spanning the past two decades, this exhibition also includes several specially designed installations undertaken by artists on site. Curated by Michelle Grabner, SAIC, and Annika Marie, Columbia College, "Picturing the Studio" is presented in conjunction with the College Art Association's 98th Annual Conference in Chicago, February 11-13, 2010. It is made possible in part with funds from the College Art Association and the Illinois Art Council, a state agency.

Artists include: Bas Jan Ader, Conrad Bakker, John Baldessari, Stephanie Brooks, Ivan Brunetti, Ann Craven, Julian Dashper, Dana DeGiulio, Susanne Doremus, Joe Fig, Dan Fischer, Julia Fish, Nicholas Frank, Alicia Frankovich, Judith Geichman, Rodney Graham, Karl Haendel, Shane Huffman, Barbara Kasten, Matt Keegan, Daniel Lavitt, Adelheid Mers, Tom Moody, Bruce Nauman, Paul Nudd, Frank Piatek, Leland Rice, David Robbins, Kay Rosen, Amanda Ross-Ho, Carrie Schneider, Roman Signer, Amy Sillman, Frances Stark, Nicholas Steindorf, and James Welling.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_232-Picturing_the_Studio.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:07pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 231: J. Morgan Puett

This week Bad At Sports debuts its collaborative partnership with the online journal Art Practical. Scott Oliver, who has previously been on the show with the Collective Foundation, sits down with J. Morgan Puett. They discuss Mildred's Lane, a collaborative project with Mark Dion, the revolutionary politics of garments, and reclaiming the term migrant worker. An abridged transcript of the conversation can be found at Art Practical <http://www.artpractical.com/> .

Hooshing and the Nexus of Clothing: A Conversation with J. Morgan Puett
By Scott Oliver 

I met J. Morgan Puett during her Bridge Residency at the Headlands Center for the Arts this past fall. I knew little of her or her work, but was immediately struck by her warmth and charm, and by the language she used to talk about her practice. She refers to it as “a practice of being” in which “an ethics of comportment” defines any engagement she might have—with students, collaborators, participants, fellow artists-in-residence. But also with her son’s teacher or her car mechanic. Terms like “hoosh,” “workstyles (a play on lifestyles),” “algorithm,” “emergent,” “entangled,” and “complexity” pepper Puett’s speech, effectively communicating her expansive approach to art. She doesn’t often mention “social practice,” perhaps because her work has been socially engaged all along. But the term is also insufficient, so is “installation art” (a form her work often resembles). Puett’s work is difficult to summarize. It is sprawling, layered, immersive and open-ended. It is as intellectually rich as it is sensually pleasurable. It is narrative, process-based and participatory. In short, it is meant to be experienced, yet none-the-less fascinating to discuss.

Scott Oliver is a sculptor and project-based artist living and working in Oakland, California. He has written catalogue essays for Southern Exposure, The Present Group, and independent curator Joseph del Pesco. Oliver co-founded Shotgun Review, an on-line source for reviews of Bay Area visual art exhibitions, with del Pesco in 2005 where he was a regular contributor until 2008. He is currently working on an audio walking tour of Oakland’s Lake Merritt.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_231-JMorganPuett.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:00pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 230: NADA part 3 - Brendan Fowler & Paul Gabrielli This week: The third of our NADA shows from Miami. This time Amanda and Duncan talk to Brendan Fowler and Paul Gabrielli.

Brendan Fowler (born 24 March 1978 in Berkeley, California) is a musician, best known for his work under the moniker BARR, based in Los Angeles. He is a regular performer at The Smell, a DIY music venue. He also co-runs Doggpony Records and is a co-editor of ANP (Artist Network Program) Quarterly - an Orange County based arts and culture publication funded by RVCA. He has recently played at the New York performance space, The Kitchen, and has been featured in Artforum Magazine. In 2006 Fowler curated a show at David Kordansky gallery in Los Angeles. New England Roses, a band consisting of Fowler, Sarah Shapiro, and Le Tigre's JD Samson, released their debut, Face Time With Son, in 2005. His new electronic-folk-pop band, Car Clutch, with Ethan Swan, had their debut performance in fall of 2006.

New York-based artist Paul Gabrielli offers work of quiet maximalism. He approaches sculpture as an act of appropriation, assimilating other media into one comprehensive system. While Gabrielli's practice can be seen as a continuation of his minimalist lineage, his specific objects are infused with a thwarted eroticism of both desire and restraint.

Gabrielli's works straddle the boundaries of sculpture, photography, work on paper and video, experiments in form designed to encapsulate the physical manifestation of a single thought, with all its lyricism and paradox, desire and restraint. His pieces represent both interior visions and the very real destruction of the well-defined and corporeal.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_230-Fowler-Gabrielli.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:22pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 229: NADA Nuggets 2 This week Amanda and Duncan rock the Miami area with a three-fer of NADA interviews with Ruba Katrib, Paul Gabrielli, and Atsushi Kaga. They surf the the tricky waters of "The Reach of Realism", the beauty of the everyday, and what you get out of cute Rock. Roll and love. With two brilliant young artists and a dynamite curator! This is the closest I have come to blowing the Sunday posting deadline in years, damn you influenza!
Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_229-NADA_Nuggets_2.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:21am EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 228: NADA part 1 - Heather Hubbs and Chris Duncan This week Bad at Sports begins a three or maybe four part series that we
produced at NADA (the New Art Dealers Alliance) Art Fair for 2009.

This week Amanda Browder and Duncan MacKenzie we sit down with Heather Hubbs, NADA's Director and Chris Duncan, a San Francisco based artist showing with Baer Ridgway Exhibitions. The conversations span a huge gulf as Heather talks about the roll she played in Chicago,
galvanizing a scene and what she has done with NADA, while Chris talks
about being in the studio, making and what things are like in SF.
Great conversations  to kick off a great series that was produced
inside one of the best fairs in the country.

We produced a set of limited edition Bad at Sports T-Shirts for the
event and have a small number of L, XL, and XXL's (maybe one or 2 mediums or smalls) left which are available from us for $20.00 a
piece.  Contact us at mail@badatsports.com if you are interested.
Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_228-Hubbs-Duncan.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:12pm EDT

Bad at Sports Episode 227: Guerra de la Paz This week:  The AMANDA BROWDER SHOW! Amanda and Tom start 2010 off with an interview with Miami artists Alain Guerra and Neraldo de la Paz about their collective Guerra de la Paz (awesome composite of their names) about their work, and how clothing can be more than just a shell over one person's nubile body..but a story and a basis for sculptural exploration.

Then, Mike Benedetto returns!!! He offers up a meditation on Steven Seagal, Lawman.

Guerra de la Paz is the composite name of Cuban born, American artist duo Alain Guerra (born 1968) and Neraldo de la Paz (born 1955), who have been collaborating since 1996. They are based in Miami.

Guerra was born in Havana and de le Paz in Matanzas. Guerra de la Paz work in sculpture, installation and photography. Their work references the politics of modern conflict and consumerism alongside symbols of faith; they often use old clothing to build their sculptures.

Photo by Douglas Voisin
Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_227-Guerra_de_la_Paz.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:38pm EDT